UPDATED HOMESCHOOL SCHEDULE 3/28/2020

Below is the Garnica family homeschool daily schedule that we follow Monday through Thursday, year-round with one week breaks every three months (12 weeks). We also take-off regular US holidays and birthdays.

So what changed? David and I decided to alternate Language Arts and Science/Social studies. Now Language Arts will take place Monday and Wednesday while Science/Social Studies will take place on Tuesday and Thursday.

Also, American Sign Language (ASL) has been added to our daily schedule. I believe ASL is an amazing language that is beneficial at all ages. Azaliah first learned ASL when she was a baby so she could communicate what she wanted versus crying. This worked fabulously. Unfortunately, I didn’t teach Amaziah sign language when he was a baby. Though I only allotted 15 minutes of dedicated study time for ASL, we use what we know all throughout the day.

They ASL curriculum that we follow is absolutely free! Bill Varcas is hard of hearing (HOH) and is an amazing, funny professor. There is a paid program so if your High School student needs foreign language credits then you can pay a very low payment. The free and paid version is exactly the same, but the paid version is designed to offer credit and a certificate of completion.

CURRICULUMSUBJECTSTART TIMEEND TIMETOTAL TIME
ABECEDARIANREADING9:00 AM9:25 AM25 min
ABECEDARIANWRITING/SPELLING9:30 AM9:55 AM25 min
MBTPLANGUAGE ARTS (M,W) SCIENCE/SOCIAL STUDIES (T,TH)10:00 AM10:45 AM45 min
RIGHTSTART MATHMATH10:50 AM11:35 AM45 min
FABER PIANO ADVENTUREPIANO11:40 AM11:55 AM15 min
LIFE PRINTASL12:00 PM12:15 PM15 min
SUMMITBIBLE STUDIES5:00 PM5:45 PM45 min
TIME3 hrs 35 min
GARNICA FAMILY DAILY HOMESCHOOL SCHEDULE (updated 3/28/2020)

At first glance it may seem like a lot, but we are only instructing four days a week for 3 hours and 35 minutes a day. Compare this to the 6.5+ hours a day, five days a week that public or private school students have not including getting up, riding the bus to school, sitting in school, and riding the bus home, homework or extracurricular activities.

Also, homeschooling means a 1:1 teach experience and on really great days with both of available, 2:1. Public school have an average 1:30 teacher-student ratio. So you see, you can get a lot more done in a small amount of time since there learning is focused on less students.

What does your homeschool daily schedule look like?

HOMESCHOOL YEAR-ROUND – PROS & CONS

Public school and most private school have 10-month school schedules, while others do a year-round schedule. Here I will layout the pros and cons of a year-round schedule.

When we began homeschooling we didn’t know what we were going to do and as time went on it felt more natural to homeschool year-round. We both worked year-round and this kept our schedule consistent. Consistency is key.

YEAR-ROUND SCHEDULE

PROS

  • Less work throughout the year – Many who homeschool year-round take the usual 180-day curriculum and spread it out over a longer span. As a result, students do less work each day but they still complete the curriculum in one year’s time. For you, this will translate into less stress! When homeschooling year round, you don’t have to worry about cramming all of our learning into a 36-week schedule.  Instead, you have 52-weeks to work with.
  • More time – Having more time also allows you to take ‘rabbit trails’ more often without the guilt of falling behind and allows your family to immerse yourselves in topics that really interest you. Homeschooling year round allows for more time to be spent with a struggling learner.  If one of the kids is having difficulty with a certain math concept or is struggling with reading, this allows for extra time to master the skill without feeling hurried.
  • Better times off – As you may have guessed, homeschooling year-round provides you with more time to take off. Summer break usually lasts 2-2 1/2 months, Winter break 2 weeks, Spring and Mid-Winter break are each 1 week. Homeschooling year-round simply means spreading all that time off throughout the school year and being able to plan vacations for times outside of regular school breaks.
  • Flexibility –  Instead of a 5-day school week, we can easily cut back to a 4-day school week without having to overfill those 4 days. We can also spread out our breaks and take small breaks more often instead of one or two longer breaks. We can take a day off here and there (due to sickness, a field trip, an impromptu play date, or just because we feel like it) without feeling like we are going to get behind
  • Skills stay sharp – Since you’re not taking a long summer hiatus from school, those academic skills you and your child work so hard on will stay fresh in their mind! Because of this, you won’t waste any time re-teaching or doing the review that consumes 2+ weeks of school years.
  • Extracurricular Activities – Join a co-op, take piano, gymnastics practice or driving lessons can all be done on less busy days or less busy times and not feel like it’s taking up some of our learning time at home. With year-round homeschooling we are able to let our children explore extra activities, like sports and music lessons, without feeling like we are taking away from ‘school time.’
  • No break woes- Coming back from vacation or long breaks can be seriously difficult mentally and physically. You won’t have an adjustment period of getting back into the school routine again because we never left it (for too long).
  • More like real life – Homeschooling is a lifestyle, and life is all year, not just 180 days or 8-10 months out of the year. Learning should be constant, kids should be constantly exploring, and constantly trying new things. Unless your a teach, in the ‘real world,’ they won’t be taking 2- to 3-month long vacations from their jobs, so why would they do it for school? ‘Real life’ is happening all around us – things like moving, babies being born, job changes, sicknesses, vacations, and holidays – homeschooling year-round allows us to live life, enjoy it, and learn from it as well.

CONS

  • You never get a real break – Since you’re homeschooling day in and day out, it may seem there’s never that “break” to look forward to. Sure, you can take off days here and there, but it isn’t the same as taking weeks off to do next to nothing! BUT you can have a schedule like our where we go 12 weeks on, 1 weeks off PLUS all US holiday off.
  • It’s too easy to fall behind – One thing you may have to be vigilant about when doing year-round homeschooling is the tendency to fall behind. Some may feel like they have all the time in the world to get things done and so what’s one random day off? There’s nothing wrong with that, provided you don’t make a habit out of it. Otherwise, those “random days off” can accumulate into falling behind.
  • Too far ahead – Okay this doesn’t seem like a con, but it’s a trap we recently discovered. Our daughter IS excelling very quickly and very far ahead of her age, but we started to catch on that we helped her too much. For this reason we have decided to go back and review subjects allowing her to complete the assignment independently to evaluate what areas we may need to work on again. Be sure that your child can do their work with independence after teaching them!
  • Your kids may complain – Although kids generally like the idea of doing less school each day or doing a subject every other day (or however you arrange it), you may also hear them gripe that the rest of the world has a summer break but “we never do!” You can address this by promising they can start later in the day during summer and still sleep in. Or, perhaps you agree that summer schooling is very light, not taking on any big projects or anything time-consuming. Or my favorite is reminding them 12-months out of the year they never wake up to an alarm, they get awesome breakfast each day, don’t sit on a bus and homeschooling is way more fun than traditional schooling with much shorter days and only 4-days a week. Perspective. Don’t be afraid to give your young one a dose of reality lol

By all means this list does not include every single pro and con to year-round homeschool and I will continue to expand as I grow more experienced in homeschooling myself! I hope you find this helpful in deciding whether to homeschool year-round or on a 8, 9 or 10 month schedule. Stay tuned for the pros and cons of homeschooling 8, 9 or 10 months.

HOMESCHOOL DAILY SCHEDULE

Below is our homeschool daily schedule that we follow Monday through Thursday, year-round with one week breaks every three months (12 weeks) not including regular US holidays. We recently updated it to slow down and enjoy the experience more!

The times are the MAXIMUM amount of time we are willing to spend on each area/curriculum so we all don’t burn out. This schedule in particular is 3+ years of fine tuning and I predict it will continue to evolve as the kids get older or life changes.

Breaks are 5 minutes long which is PLENTY of time to use the restroom and grab a drink/snack. Public schools have 3-6 minute to use the restroom and make it to their next class…..

Word of advice: be flexible!

CURRICULUMSUBJECTSTART TIMEEND TIMETOTAL TIME
ABECEDARIANREADING9:00 AM9:25 AM25 min
ABECEDARIANWRITING/SPELLING9:30 AM9:55 AM25 min
MBTPLANGUAGE ARTS (M,W) SCIENCE/SOCIAL STUDIES (T,TH)10:00 AM10:45 AM45 min
RIGHTSTART MATHMATH10:50 AM11:35 AM45 min
FABER PIANO ADVENTUREPIANO11:40 AM11:55 AM15 min
LIFE PRINTASL12:00 PM12:15 PM15 min
SUMMITBIBLE STUDIES5:00 PM5:45 PM45 min
TIME3 hrs 35 min
GARNICA FAMILY DAILY HOMESCHOOL SCHEDULE

At first glance it may seem like a lot, but we are only instructing four days a week for 3 hours and 35 minutes a day. Compare this to the 6.5+ hours a day, five days a week that public or private school students have not including getting up, riding the bus to school, sitting in school, and riding the bus home, homework or extracurricular activities.

Also, homeschooling means a 1:1 teach experience and on really great days with both of available, 2:1. Public school have an average 1:30 teacher-student ratio. So you see, you can get a lot more done in a small amount of time since there learning is focused on less students.

Some people make the assumption less instruction time=less learning, school at home=less structure, no certified teacher=quality of education lacks. Let me be the first squash those absolutely disgusting, faulty assumptions. Homeschooling is what the parents put into it. We invest A LOT of time communicating with each what each of us needs to teach, who will teach what subjects which days, preparing ahead of time, reviewing areas that need work with the kids, finding additional resources if the kids still don’t understand, find additional resources if we don’t understand and SO. MUCH. MORE.

The most critical aspect (in our opinion) that makes this homeschool schedule doable is our attitude everyday as we begin and approach our school day. We are so blessed to have the resources to be able to instruct our children, watch them learn, spend way more time together and seriously get to have so much fun in the process. Why just read about some of these historical places? We pack up and go there ourselves within the year as time and expenses permit. Why talk about how caterpillars go into a cocoon and come out a butterfly? We can have a butterfly kit and see it ourselves.

You may be wonder where is time for socializing? Well, we do don’t need to schedule that. We play outside and fortunately at campgrounds there is no shortage of other people AND we attend way too many events with plenty of opportunity for the kids to talk to adults and children.

What does your homeschool daily schedule look like?